diff mbox series

manual: Clarify File Access Modes section and add O_PATH

Message ID 878shpfzs6.fsf@oldenburg2.str.redhat.com
State New
Headers show
Series manual: Clarify File Access Modes section and add O_PATH | expand

Commit Message

Florian Weimer May 18, 2020, 7:49 a.m. UTC
Kees Cook reported that the current text is misleading:

  <https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/202005150847.2B1ED8F81@keescook/>

---
 manual/llio.texi | 68 ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++----------------------
 1 file changed, 42 insertions(+), 26 deletions(-)

Comments

Michael Kerrisk (man-pages) May 18, 2020, 7:57 p.m. UTC | #1
Hi Florian,

On 5/18/20 9:49 AM, Florian Weimer wrote:
> Kees Cook reported that the current text is misleading:
> 
>   <https://lore.kernel.org/lkml/202005150847.2B1ED8F81@keescook/>
> 
> ---
>  manual/llio.texi | 68 ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++----------------------
>  1 file changed, 42 insertions(+), 26 deletions(-)
> 
> diff --git a/manual/llio.texi b/manual/llio.texi
> index 6db4a70836..dd206b1b91 100644
> --- a/manual/llio.texi
> +++ b/manual/llio.texi
> @@ -3564,9 +3564,8 @@ The symbols in this section are defined in the header file
>  @subsection File Access Modes
>  
>  The file access modes allow a file descriptor to be used for reading,
> -writing, or both.  (On @gnuhurdsystems{}, they can also allow none of these,
> -and allow execution of the file as a program.)  The access modes are chosen
> -when the file is opened, and never change.
> +writing, both, or neither.  The access modes are chosen when the file
> +is opened, and never change.
>  
>  @deftypevr Macro int O_RDONLY
>  @standards{POSIX.1, fcntl.h}
> @@ -3583,6 +3582,42 @@ Open the file for write access.
>  Open the file for both reading and writing.
>  @end deftypevr
>  
> +@deftypevr Macro int O_PATH
> +@standards{Linux, fcntl.h}
> +Obtain a file descriptor for the file, but do not open this file for
> +reading or writing.  Permission checks for the file itself are skipped
> +when the file is opened (but permission to access the directory that
> +contains it is still needed), and permissions are checked when the
> +descriptor is used later.
> +
> +For example, such descriptors can be used with the @code{fexecve}
> +function (@pxref{Executing a File}).
> +
> +This access mode is specific to Linux.  On @gnuhurdsystems{}, it is
> +possible to use @code{O_EXEC} explicitly, or specify no access modes
> +at all (see below).
> +@end deftypevr
> +
> +To determine the file access mode with @code{fcntl}, you must extract
> +the access mode bits from the retrieved file status flags.  The
> +portable way to extract the file access mode bits is with
> +@code{O_ACCMODE}.
> +
> +@deftypevr Macro int O_ACCMODE
> +@standards{POSIX.1, fcntl.h}
> +
> +This macro stands for a mask that can be bitwise-ANDed with the file

s/stands for a mask/is a mask/ ?

> +status flag value to produce a value representing the file access

s/produce a value representing the/extract the bits representing the/ ?

> +mode.  Usually, The mode will be @code{O_RDONLY}, @code{O_WRONLY}, or
> +@code{O_RDWR}.
> +@end deftypevr
> +
> +If the mode is zero, it means that a non-standard access mode has been
> +used.

Either I misunderstand the previous sentence, or I think it is
wrong. O_RDONLY has the value 0; that's a standard access mode.

> See @code{O_PATH} above and @code{O_EXEC} below.  These
> +non-standard access modes are identified by individual bits can
> +therefore be checked directly (without masking with @code{O_ACCMODE}
> +first).
> +
>  On @gnuhurdsystems{} (and not on other systems), @code{O_RDONLY} and

Not a problem with your patch, but in the above, better would be:

s/and/but/

>  @code{O_WRONLY} are independent bits that can be bitwise-ORed together,
>  and it is valid for either bit to be set or clear.  This means that
> @@ -3591,40 +3626,21 @@ mode of zero is permissible; it allows no operations that do input or
>  output to the file, but does allow other operations such as
>  @code{fchmod}.  On @gnuhurdsystems{}, since ``read-only'' or ``write-only''
>  is a misnomer, @file{fcntl.h} defines additional names for the file
> -access modes.  These names are preferred when writing GNU-specific code.
> -But most programs will want to be portable to other POSIX.1 systems and
> -should use the POSIX.1 names above instead.
> +access modes.

I do think removing this advice about POSIX is a bad move.
Why do you want to advise people to use GNU-specific names?
(I suspect I must be missing something...)

>  @deftypevr Macro int O_READ
>  @standards{GNU, fcntl.h (optional)}
> -Open the file for reading.  Same as @code{O_RDONLY}; only defined on GNU.
> +Open the file for reading.  Same as @code{O_RDONLY}; only defined on GNU/Hurd.
>  @end deftypevr
>  
>  @deftypevr Macro int O_WRITE
>  @standards{GNU, fcntl.h (optional)}
> -Open the file for writing.  Same as @code{O_WRONLY}; only defined on GNU.
> +Open the file for writing.  Same as @code{O_WRONLY}; only defined on GNU/Hurd.
>  @end deftypevr
>  
>  @deftypevr Macro int O_EXEC
>  @standards{GNU, fcntl.h (optional)}
> -Open the file for executing.  Only defined on GNU.
> -@end deftypevr
> -
> -To determine the file access mode with @code{fcntl}, you must extract
> -the access mode bits from the retrieved file status flags.  On
> -@gnuhurdsystems{},
> -you can just test the @code{O_READ} and @code{O_WRITE} bits in
> -the flags word.  But in other POSIX.1 systems, reading and writing
> -access modes are not stored as distinct bit flags.  The portable way to
> -extract the file access mode bits is with @code{O_ACCMODE}.
> -
> -@deftypevr Macro int O_ACCMODE
> -@standards{POSIX.1, fcntl.h}
> -This macro stands for a mask that can be bitwise-ANDed with the file
> -status flag value to produce a value representing the file access mode.
> -The mode will be @code{O_RDONLY}, @code{O_WRONLY}, or @code{O_RDWR}.
> -(On @gnuhurdsystems{} it could also be zero, and it never includes the
> -@code{O_EXEC} bit.)
> +Open the file for executing.  Only defined on GNU/Hurd.
>  @end deftypevr
>  
>  @node Open-time Flags

Thanks,

Michael
Florian Weimer May 19, 2020, 11:03 a.m. UTC | #2
* Michael Kerrisk:

>> +mode.  Usually, The mode will be @code{O_RDONLY}, @code{O_WRONLY}, or
>> +@code{O_RDWR}.
>> +@end deftypevr
>> +
>> +If the mode is zero, it means that a non-standard access mode has been
>> +used.
>
> Either I misunderstand the previous sentence, or I think it is
> wrong. O_RDONLY has the value 0; that's a standard access mode.

Meh, I had forgotten about that.  That makes the interaction of
O_ACCMODE and non-POSIX access modes certainly more complicated.

I'll have to think about it.

>>  @code{O_WRONLY} are independent bits that can be bitwise-ORed together,
>>  and it is valid for either bit to be set or clear.  This means that
>> @@ -3591,40 +3626,21 @@ mode of zero is permissible; it allows no operations that do input or
>>  output to the file, but does allow other operations such as
>>  @code{fchmod}.  On @gnuhurdsystems{}, since ``read-only'' or ``write-only''
>>  is a misnomer, @file{fcntl.h} defines additional names for the file
>> -access modes.  These names are preferred when writing GNU-specific code.
>> -But most programs will want to be portable to other POSIX.1 systems and
>> -should use the POSIX.1 names above instead.
>> +access modes.
>
> I do think removing this advice about POSIX is a bad move.
> Why do you want to advise people to use GNU-specific names?
> (I suspect I must be missing something...)

“GNU-specific code” is ambiguous.  We sometimes talk about the
platform-independent GNU API, meaning the API that glibc provides on all
ports.  But here, “GNU-specific” really means “Hurd-specific”.

Thanks,
Florian
Michael Kerrisk (man-pages) May 19, 2020, 8:25 p.m. UTC | #3
Hi Florian,

[...]

> >>  @code{O_WRONLY} are independent bits that can be bitwise-ORed together,
> >>  and it is valid for either bit to be set or clear.  This means that
> >> @@ -3591,40 +3626,21 @@ mode of zero is permissible; it allows no operations that do input or
> >>  output to the file, but does allow other operations such as
> >>  @code{fchmod}.  On @gnuhurdsystems{}, since ``read-only'' or ``write-only''
> >>  is a misnomer, @file{fcntl.h} defines additional names for the file
> >> -access modes.  These names are preferred when writing GNU-specific code.
> >> -But most programs will want to be portable to other POSIX.1 systems and
> >> -should use the POSIX.1 names above instead.
> >> +access modes.
> >
> > I do think removing this advice about POSIX is a bad move.
> > Why do you want to advise people to use GNU-specific names?
> > (I suspect I must be missing something...)
>
> “GNU-specific code” is ambiguous.  We sometimes talk about the
> platform-independent GNU API, meaning the API that glibc provides on all
> ports.  But here, “GNU-specific” really means “Hurd-specific”.

Got it. On second thoughts, I think your change here is fune.

Thanks,

Michael
diff mbox series

Patch

diff --git a/manual/llio.texi b/manual/llio.texi
index 6db4a70836..dd206b1b91 100644
--- a/manual/llio.texi
+++ b/manual/llio.texi
@@ -3564,9 +3564,8 @@  The symbols in this section are defined in the header file
 @subsection File Access Modes
 
 The file access modes allow a file descriptor to be used for reading,
-writing, or both.  (On @gnuhurdsystems{}, they can also allow none of these,
-and allow execution of the file as a program.)  The access modes are chosen
-when the file is opened, and never change.
+writing, both, or neither.  The access modes are chosen when the file
+is opened, and never change.
 
 @deftypevr Macro int O_RDONLY
 @standards{POSIX.1, fcntl.h}
@@ -3583,6 +3582,42 @@  Open the file for write access.
 Open the file for both reading and writing.
 @end deftypevr
 
+@deftypevr Macro int O_PATH
+@standards{Linux, fcntl.h}
+Obtain a file descriptor for the file, but do not open this file for
+reading or writing.  Permission checks for the file itself are skipped
+when the file is opened (but permission to access the directory that
+contains it is still needed), and permissions are checked when the
+descriptor is used later.
+
+For example, such descriptors can be used with the @code{fexecve}
+function (@pxref{Executing a File}).
+
+This access mode is specific to Linux.  On @gnuhurdsystems{}, it is
+possible to use @code{O_EXEC} explicitly, or specify no access modes
+at all (see below).
+@end deftypevr
+
+To determine the file access mode with @code{fcntl}, you must extract
+the access mode bits from the retrieved file status flags.  The
+portable way to extract the file access mode bits is with
+@code{O_ACCMODE}.
+
+@deftypevr Macro int O_ACCMODE
+@standards{POSIX.1, fcntl.h}
+
+This macro stands for a mask that can be bitwise-ANDed with the file
+status flag value to produce a value representing the file access
+mode.  Usually, The mode will be @code{O_RDONLY}, @code{O_WRONLY}, or
+@code{O_RDWR}.
+@end deftypevr
+
+If the mode is zero, it means that a non-standard access mode has been
+used.  See @code{O_PATH} above and @code{O_EXEC} below.  These
+non-standard access modes are identified by individual bits can
+therefore be checked directly (without masking with @code{O_ACCMODE}
+first).
+
 On @gnuhurdsystems{} (and not on other systems), @code{O_RDONLY} and
 @code{O_WRONLY} are independent bits that can be bitwise-ORed together,
 and it is valid for either bit to be set or clear.  This means that
@@ -3591,40 +3626,21 @@  mode of zero is permissible; it allows no operations that do input or
 output to the file, but does allow other operations such as
 @code{fchmod}.  On @gnuhurdsystems{}, since ``read-only'' or ``write-only''
 is a misnomer, @file{fcntl.h} defines additional names for the file
-access modes.  These names are preferred when writing GNU-specific code.
-But most programs will want to be portable to other POSIX.1 systems and
-should use the POSIX.1 names above instead.
+access modes.
 
 @deftypevr Macro int O_READ
 @standards{GNU, fcntl.h (optional)}
-Open the file for reading.  Same as @code{O_RDONLY}; only defined on GNU.
+Open the file for reading.  Same as @code{O_RDONLY}; only defined on GNU/Hurd.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @deftypevr Macro int O_WRITE
 @standards{GNU, fcntl.h (optional)}
-Open the file for writing.  Same as @code{O_WRONLY}; only defined on GNU.
+Open the file for writing.  Same as @code{O_WRONLY}; only defined on GNU/Hurd.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @deftypevr Macro int O_EXEC
 @standards{GNU, fcntl.h (optional)}
-Open the file for executing.  Only defined on GNU.
-@end deftypevr
-
-To determine the file access mode with @code{fcntl}, you must extract
-the access mode bits from the retrieved file status flags.  On
-@gnuhurdsystems{},
-you can just test the @code{O_READ} and @code{O_WRITE} bits in
-the flags word.  But in other POSIX.1 systems, reading and writing
-access modes are not stored as distinct bit flags.  The portable way to
-extract the file access mode bits is with @code{O_ACCMODE}.
-
-@deftypevr Macro int O_ACCMODE
-@standards{POSIX.1, fcntl.h}
-This macro stands for a mask that can be bitwise-ANDed with the file
-status flag value to produce a value representing the file access mode.
-The mode will be @code{O_RDONLY}, @code{O_WRONLY}, or @code{O_RDWR}.
-(On @gnuhurdsystems{} it could also be zero, and it never includes the
-@code{O_EXEC} bit.)
+Open the file for executing.  Only defined on GNU/Hurd.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @node Open-time Flags