Patchwork Tidy up ObjC/ObjC++ release notes - avoid repeating continuously "both in Objective-C and Objective-C++"

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Submitter Nicola Pero
Date Feb. 7, 2011, 10:27 p.m.
Message ID <1297117638.374431192@192.168.4.58>
Download mbox | patch
Permalink /patch/82179/
State New
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Comments

Nicola Pero - Feb. 7, 2011, 10:27 p.m.
After long discussions (and guidance from Gerald and Iain in private emails),
I applied this (trivial) patch.

It is a purely stilistic change aimed to make the text more readable and less
boring/repetitive.

All it does is to replace "supported both in Objective-C and Objective-C++"
with "supported", and using "it" or "they" instead of repetitive text in a
few sentences.

Thanks

Patch

Index: changes.html
===================================================================
RCS file: /cvs/gcc/wwwdocs/htdocs/gcc-4.6/changes.html,v
retrieving revision 1.108
diff -u -r1.108 changes.html
--- changes.html        7 Feb 2011 13:25:13 -0000       1.108
+++ changes.html        7 Feb 2011 22:06:42 -0000
@@ -493,23 +493,21 @@ 
     disable them by using the new <code>-fobjc-std=objc1</code>
     command-line option.</li>
 
-    <li>The Objective-C 2.0 dot-syntax is now supported both in
-    Objective-C and Objective-C++.  The dot-syntax is an alternative
-    syntax for using getters and setters; <code>object.count</code> is
-    automatically converted into <code>[object count]</code> or
-    <code>[object setCount: ...]</code> depending on context; for
-    example <code>if (object.count > 0)</code> is automatically
-    compiled into the equivalent of <code>if ([object count] >
-    0)</code> while <code>object.count = 0;</code> is automatically
-    compiled into the equivalent ot <code>[object setCount:
-    0];</code>.  The dot-syntax can be used with instance and class
-    objects and with any setters or getters, no matter if they are
-    part of a declared property or not.</li>
-
-    <li>Objective-C 2.0 declared properties are now supported both in
-    Objective-C and Objective-C++.  Declared properties are declared
-    using the new <code>@property</code> keyword, and are most
-    commonly used in conjunction with the new Objective-C 2.0
+    <li>The Objective-C 2.0 dot-syntax is now supported.  It is an
+    alternative syntax for using getters and setters;
+    <code>object.count</code> is automatically converted into
+    <code>[object count]</code> or <code>[object setCount: ...]</code>
+    depending on context; for example <code>if (object.count >
+    0)</code> is automatically compiled into the equivalent of
+    <code>if ([object count] > 0)</code> while <code>object.count =
+    0;</code> is automatically compiled into the equivalent ot
+    <code>[object setCount: 0];</code>.  The dot-syntax can be used
+    with instance and class objects and with any setters or getters,
+    no matter if they are part of a declared property or not.</li>
+
+    <li>Objective-C 2.0 declared properties are now supported.  They
+    are declared using the new <code>@property</code> keyword, and are
+    most commonly used in conjunction with the new Objective-C 2.0
     dot-syntax.  The <code>nonatomic</code>, <code>readonly</code>,
     <code>readwrite</code>, <code>assign</code>, <code>retain</code>,
     <code>copy</code>, <code>setter</code> and <code>getter</code>
@@ -517,16 +515,16 @@ 
     <code>__attribute__ ((deprecated))</code> is supported too.</li>
 
     <li>The Objective-C 2.0 <code>@synthesize</code> and
-    <code>@dynamic</code> keywords are supported both in Objective-C
-    and Objective-C++.  <code>@synthesize</code> causes the compiler
-    to automatically synthesize a declared property, while
-    <code>@dynamic</code> is used to disable all warnings for a
-    declared property for which no implementation is provided at
-    compile time.  Synthesizing declared properties requires runtime
-    support in most useful cases; to be able to use it with the GNU
-    runtime, appropriate helper functions have been added to the GNU
-    Objective-C runtime ABI, and are implemented by the GNU
-    Objective-C runtime library shipped with GCC.</li>
+    <code>@dynamic</code> keywords are supported.
+    <code>@synthesize</code> causes the compiler to automatically
+    synthesize a declared property, while <code>@dynamic</code> is
+    used to disable all warnings for a declared property for which no
+    implementation is provided at compile time.  Synthesizing declared
+    properties requires runtime support in most useful cases; to be
+    able to use it with the GNU runtime, appropriate helper functions
+    have been added to the GNU Objective-C runtime ABI, and are
+    implemented by the GNU Objective-C runtime library shipped with
+    GCC.</li>
 
     <li>The Objective-C 2.0 fast enumeration syntax is supported in
     Objective-C.  This is currently not yet available in
@@ -535,38 +533,34 @@ 
     library (shipped with GCC).</li>
 
     <li>The Objective-C 2.0 <code>@optional</code> keyword is
-    supported in Objective-C and Objective-C++.  This keyword allows
-    you to mark methods or properties in a protocol as optional as
-    opposed to required.</li>
+    supported.  It allows you to mark methods or properties in a
+    protocol as optional as opposed to required.</li>
 
     <li>The Objective-C 2.0 <code>@package</code> keyword is
-    supported in Objective-C and Objective-C++.  This keyword has
-    currently the same effect as the <code>@public</code>
-    keyword.</li>
-
-    <li>Objective-C 2.0 method attributes are supported both in
-    Objective-C and Objective-C++.  Currently the supported attributes
-    are <code>deprecated</code>, <code>sentinel</code>,
-    <code>noreturn</code> and <code>format</code>.</li>
-
-    <li>Objective-C 2.0 method argument attributes are supported
-    both in Objective-C and Objective-C++.  The most widely used
-    attribute is <code>unused</code>, to mark an argument as unused in
-    the implementation.</li>
-
-    <li>Objective-C 2.0 class and protocol attributes are supported
-    both in Objective-C and Objective-C++.  Currently the only supported
-    attribute is <code>deprecated</code>.</li>
-
-    <li>Objective-C 2.0 class extensions are supported both in
-    Objective-C and Objective-C++.  A class extension has the same
-    syntax as a category declaration with no category name, and the
-    methods and properties declared in it are added directly to the
-    main class.  It is mostly used as an alternative to a category to
-    add methods to a class without advertising them in the public
-    headers, with the advantage that for class extensions the compiler
-    checks that all the privately declared methods are actually
-    implemented.</li>
+    supported.  It has currently the same effect as the
+    <code>@public</code> keyword.</li>
+
+    <li>Objective-C 2.0 method attributes are supported.  Currently
+    the supported attributes are <code>deprecated</code>,
+    <code>sentinel</code>, <code>noreturn</code> and
+    <code>format</code>.</li>
+
+    <li>Objective-C 2.0 method argument attributes are supported.  The
+    most widely used attribute is <code>unused</code>, to mark an
+    argument as unused in the implementation.</li>
+
+    <li>Objective-C 2.0 class and protocol attributes are supported.
+    Currently the only supported attribute is
+    <code>deprecated</code>.</li>
+
+    <li>Objective-C 2.0 class extensions are supported.  A class
+    extension has the same syntax as a category declaration with no
+    category name, and the methods and properties declared in it are
+    added directly to the main class.  It is mostly used as an
+    alternative to a category to add methods to a class without
+    advertising them in the public headers, with the advantage that
+    for class extensions the compiler checks that all the privately
+    declared methods are actually implemented.</li>
 
     <li>As a result of these enhancements, GCC can now be used to
     build Objective-C and Objective-C++ software that uses Foundation