Patchwork powerpc: check crash_base for relocatable kernel

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Submitter Milton Miller
Date Jan. 2, 2009, 8:46 p.m.
Message ID <kexec-29-1-7.miltonm@bga.com>
Download mbox | patch
Permalink /patch/16340/
State Accepted
Headers show

Comments

Milton Miller - Jan. 2, 2009, 8:46 p.m.
Enforce that the crash kernel region never overlaps the current kernel,
as it will be written directly on kexec load.

Also, default to the previous KDUMP_KERNELBASE if the start is 0.

Other architectures (x86, ia64) state that specifying the start address
0 (or omitting it) will result in the kernel allocating it.  Before the
relocatable patch in 2.6.28, powerpc would adjust any other start value
to the hardcoded KDUMP_KERNELBASE of 32M.

Signed-off-by: Milton Miller <miltonm@bga.com>
---
consider for stable 2.6.28:

A crash region start of 0 results either in a kernel panic (if all of
segemnt 0 is reserved) or confused kexec userspace (as the start
and length are not exported to userspace):

Starting new kernel
Reserving 512MB of memory at 0MB for crashkernel (System RAM: 2048MB)
Using pSeries machine description

...

[boot]0012 Setup Arch
Kernel panic - not syncing: ERROR: Failed to allocate 0x4000 bytes below 0x10000000.

or

# kexec -p /root/vmlinux
Memory for crashkernel is not reserved
Please reserve memory by passing "crashkernel=X@Y" parameter to the kernel
Then try loading kdump kernel
# cat /proc/cmdline
retain_initrd crashkernel=64M
#
Michael Ellerman - Jan. 6, 2009, 11:44 p.m.
On Fri, 2009-01-02 at 14:46 -0600, Milton Miller wrote:
> @@ -94,10 +95,35 @@ void __init reserve_crashkernel(void)
>  				KDUMP_KERNELBASE);
>  
>  	crashk_res.start = KDUMP_KERNELBASE;
> +#else
> +	if (!crashk_res.start) {
> +		/*
> +		 * unspecified address, choose a region of specified size
> +		 * can overlap with initrd (ignoring corruption when retained)
> +		 * ppc64 requires kernel and some stacks to be in first segemnt
> +		 */
> +		crashk_res.start = KDUMP_KERNELBASE;
> +	}
> +
> +	crash_base = PAGE_ALIGN(crashk_res.start);
> +	if (crash_base != crashk_res.start) {
> +		printk("Crash kernel base must be aligned to 0x%lx\n",
> +				PAGE_SIZE);
> +		crashk_res.start = crash_base;
> +	}
> +
>  #endif
>  	crash_size = PAGE_ALIGN(crash_size);
>  	crashk_res.end = crashk_res.start + crash_size - 1;
>  
> +	/* The crash region must not overlap the current kernel */
> +	if (overlaps_crashkernel(__pa(_stext), _end - _stext)) {
> +		printk(KERN_WARNING
> +			"Crash kernel can not overlap current kernel\n");
> +		crashk_res.start = crashk_res.end = 0;
> +		return;
> +	}

I think we can be smarter here. Why don't we adjust the crash kernel
region so that it doesn't overlap the first kernel? ie. move it up a
bit.

There's also the issue of the RMO, I'm not sure what we should do there,
but I think the kernel needs some smarts otherwise users are going to
shoot themselves in the foot.

We could ignore the @x setting and split the RMO between both kernels
somewhat intelligently.

What might work is multiple crash regions, that way we could have some
space in the RMO for the second kernel (say 32MB?), but the rest outside
- leaving some RMO for the first kernel. But I think that would require
some serious surgery.

cheers
Milton Miller - Jan. 7, 2009, 2:57 p.m.
[removed Paul from cc and fixed Mohan's email]

On Jan 6, 2009, at 5:44 PM, Michael Ellerman wrote:

> On Fri, 2009-01-02 at 14:46 -0600, Milton Miller wrote:
>> @@ -94,10 +95,35 @@ void __init reserve_crashkernel(void)
>>  				KDUMP_KERNELBASE);
>>
>>  	crashk_res.start = KDUMP_KERNELBASE;
>> +#else
>> +	if (!crashk_res.start) {
>> +		/*
>> +		 * unspecified address, choose a region of specified size
>> +		 * can overlap with initrd (ignoring corruption when retained)
>> +		 * ppc64 requires kernel and some stacks to be in first segemnt
>> +		 */
>> +		crashk_res.start = KDUMP_KERNELBASE;
>> +	}
>> +
>> +	crash_base = PAGE_ALIGN(crashk_res.start);
>> +	if (crash_base != crashk_res.start) {
>> +		printk("Crash kernel base must be aligned to 0x%lx\n",
>> +				PAGE_SIZE);
>> +		crashk_res.start = crash_base;
>> +	}
>> +
>>  #endif
>>  	crash_size = PAGE_ALIGN(crash_size);
>>  	crashk_res.end = crashk_res.start + crash_size - 1;
>>
>> +	/* The crash region must not overlap the current kernel */
>> +	if (overlaps_crashkernel(__pa(_stext), _end - _stext)) {
>> +		printk(KERN_WARNING
>> +			"Crash kernel can not overlap current kernel\n");
>> +		crashk_res.start = crashk_res.end = 0;
>> +		return;
>> +	}
>
> I think we can be smarter here. Why don't we adjust the crash kernel
> region so that it doesn't overlap the first kernel? ie. move it up a
> bit.

How much?   In addition to the size of the kernel, we have to allocate 
(1) the emergeency stacks as we use them to bring up secondary cpus (2) 
the irq stacks in the first segment.   While the second could be met 
easier on systems with 1TB slbs we don't take advantage of that yet.


>
> There's also the issue of the RMO, I'm not sure what we should do 
> there,
> but I think the kernel needs some smarts otherwise users are going to
> shoot themselves in the foot.

I was looking at the code in kexec-tools for the rmo, and it seems 
extremely broken (ie it sets rmo_top on every memory block instead of 
the lowest; the clamp to 768M is the savior for systems with multiple 
blocks).

Do we care about loading a kernel below a relocated kernel (between the 
interrupt vectors and the new kernel)?   I ignored that for now, 
arguing that we always run the first kernel at 0.


>
> We could ignore the @x setting and split the RMO between both kernels
> somewhat intelligently.
>
> What might work is multiple crash regions, that way we could have some
> space in the RMO for the second kernel (say 32MB?), but the rest 
> outside
> - leaving some RMO for the first kernel. But I think that would require
> some serious surgery.
>

Other archs have this, i guess because they read the memory out of 
/proc/iomem.   The trick is knowing what has to be put in real space 
and what can go abvoe the rmo.   Also, we have those horrible hard-code 
rmo to 768M max because some platform (one of the cell ones?) didn't 
make the device tree to show it.  Maybe we can track it down and add 
linux,usable-mem-ranges to fix it up?

Does the generic code support loading into the split regions, or is it 
just for giving the kernel room to run?



So while all of these are nice, what do you think about merging this as 
an interm measure, especially for backporting to 2.6.28 stable (and any 
distro that wants to pick up relocatable kdump)?

milton
Michael Ellerman - Jan. 8, 2009, 3:35 a.m.
On Wed, 2009-01-07 at 08:57 -0600, Milton Miller wrote:
> [removed Paul from cc and fixed Mohan's email]
> 
> On Jan 6, 2009, at 5:44 PM, Michael Ellerman wrote:
> 
> > On Fri, 2009-01-02 at 14:46 -0600, Milton Miller wrote:
> >> @@ -94,10 +95,35 @@ void __init reserve_crashkernel(void)
> >>  				KDUMP_KERNELBASE);
> >>
> >>  	crashk_res.start = KDUMP_KERNELBASE;
> >> +#else
> >> +	if (!crashk_res.start) {
> >> +		/*
> >> +		 * unspecified address, choose a region of specified size
> >> +		 * can overlap with initrd (ignoring corruption when retained)
> >> +		 * ppc64 requires kernel and some stacks to be in first segemnt
> >> +		 */
> >> +		crashk_res.start = KDUMP_KERNELBASE;
> >> +	}
> >> +
> >> +	crash_base = PAGE_ALIGN(crashk_res.start);
> >> +	if (crash_base != crashk_res.start) {
> >> +		printk("Crash kernel base must be aligned to 0x%lx\n",
> >> +				PAGE_SIZE);
> >> +		crashk_res.start = crash_base;
> >> +	}
> >> +
> >>  #endif
> >>  	crash_size = PAGE_ALIGN(crash_size);
> >>  	crashk_res.end = crashk_res.start + crash_size - 1;
> >>
> >> +	/* The crash region must not overlap the current kernel */
> >> +	if (overlaps_crashkernel(__pa(_stext), _end - _stext)) {
> >> +		printk(KERN_WARNING
> >> +			"Crash kernel can not overlap current kernel\n");
> >> +		crashk_res.start = crashk_res.end = 0;
> >> +		return;
> >> +	}
> >
> > I think we can be smarter here. Why don't we adjust the crash kernel
> > region so that it doesn't overlap the first kernel? ie. move it up a
> > bit.
> 
> How much?   In addition to the size of the kernel, we have to allocate 
> (1) the emergeency stacks as we use them to bring up secondary cpus (2) 
> the irq stacks in the first segment.   While the second could be met 
> easier on systems with 1TB slbs we don't take advantage of that yet.

Hmm, we could try and work it out though. I guess we don't know how many
CPUs we have at that point, which makes it a little trickier.

So we have the emergency stack and the hard & soft irq stacks per cpu,
which is 48KB AFAICT. So for a 256-way system that would be 12MB.

I don't think I've seen an RMO smaller than 128MB, though I notice our
RPA note specifies 64M as the minimum we'll accept. That would probably
be a bit tight.

How about something like:

min_space = _end + 16MB		(16 to be safe?)

if min_space < rmo_size / 2:
	min_space = rmo_size / 2

if crash_base < min_space:
	crash_base = min_space

> > There's also the issue of the RMO, I'm not sure what we should do 
> > there,
> > but I think the kernel needs some smarts otherwise users are going to
> > shoot themselves in the foot.
> 
> I was looking at the code in kexec-tools for the rmo, and it seems 
> extremely broken (ie it sets rmo_top on every memory block instead of 
> the lowest; the clamp to 768M is the savior for systems with multiple 
> blocks).

Oh surprise.

> Do we care about loading a kernel below a relocated kernel (between the 
> interrupt vectors and the new kernel)?   I ignored that for now, 
> arguing that we always run the first kernel at 0.

No I don't think so.

> > We could ignore the @x setting and split the RMO between both kernels
> > somewhat intelligently.
> >
> > What might work is multiple crash regions, that way we could have some
> > space in the RMO for the second kernel (say 32MB?), but the rest 
> > outside
> > - leaving some RMO for the first kernel. But I think that would require
> > some serious surgery.
> >
> 
> Other archs have this, i guess because they read the memory out of 
> /proc/iomem.   The trick is knowing what has to be put in real space 
> and what can go abvoe the rmo.   Also, we have those horrible hard-code 
> rmo to 768M max because some platform (one of the cell ones?) didn't 
> make the device tree to show it.  Maybe we can track it down and add 
> linux,usable-mem-ranges to fix it up?

Dunno about the cell, but some of the early blades did have crufty
firmware.

> Does the generic code support loading into the split regions, or is it 
> just for giving the kernel room to run?

I don't think so. I don't see any logic that deals with gaps in the
crashk region.

> So while all of these are nice, what do you think about merging this as 
> an interm measure, especially for backporting to 2.6.28 stable (and any 
> distro that wants to pick up relocatable kdump)?

I guess. I'd rather do something smarter, like I suggested above.

cheers

Patch

Index: common/arch/powerpc/kernel/machine_kexec.c
===================================================================
--- common.orig/arch/powerpc/kernel/machine_kexec.c	2009-01-01 23:43:45.000000000 -0600
+++ common/arch/powerpc/kernel/machine_kexec.c	2009-01-02 00:40:24.000000000 -0600
@@ -13,6 +13,7 @@ 
 #include <linux/reboot.h>
 #include <linux/threads.h>
 #include <linux/lmb.h>
+#include <asm/sections.h>
 #include <asm/machdep.h>
 #include <asm/prom.h>
 
@@ -94,10 +95,35 @@  void __init reserve_crashkernel(void)
 				KDUMP_KERNELBASE);
 
 	crashk_res.start = KDUMP_KERNELBASE;
+#else
+	if (!crashk_res.start) {
+		/*
+		 * unspecified address, choose a region of specified size
+		 * can overlap with initrd (ignoring corruption when retained)
+		 * ppc64 requires kernel and some stacks to be in first segemnt
+		 */
+		crashk_res.start = KDUMP_KERNELBASE;
+	}
+
+	crash_base = PAGE_ALIGN(crashk_res.start);
+	if (crash_base != crashk_res.start) {
+		printk("Crash kernel base must be aligned to 0x%lx\n",
+				PAGE_SIZE);
+		crashk_res.start = crash_base;
+	}
+
 #endif
 	crash_size = PAGE_ALIGN(crash_size);
 	crashk_res.end = crashk_res.start + crash_size - 1;
 
+	/* The crash region must not overlap the current kernel */
+	if (overlaps_crashkernel(__pa(_stext), _end - _stext)) {
+		printk(KERN_WARNING
+			"Crash kernel can not overlap current kernel\n");
+		crashk_res.start = crashk_res.end = 0;
+		return;
+	}
+
 	/* Crash kernel trumps memory limit */
 	if (memory_limit && memory_limit <= crashk_res.end) {
 		memory_limit = crashk_res.end + 1;