Patchwork [v3] fix typos in docs

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Submitter Jonathan Wakely
Date Dec. 18, 2011, 1:06 a.m.
Message ID <CAH6eHdRG_mXYONBRuM5ne2re9HFmF0qPHd5BLJ0ZZ8zycrcsVw@mail.gmail.com>
Download mbox | patch
Permalink /patch/132030/
State New
Headers show

Comments

Jonathan Wakely - Dec. 18, 2011, 1:06 a.m.
* doc/xml/manual/iterators.xml: Replace "sect1" with "section".
        * doc/xml/manual/algorithms.xml: Likewise.
        * doc/html/manual/iterators.html: Likewise.
        * doc/html/manual/algorithms.html: Likewise.

Fixes some errors probably introduced by s/section/sect1/

Rather than regenerate all the HTML pages I just fixed them manually.

Committed to trunk.

Patch

Index: doc/xml/manual/iterators.xml
===================================================================
--- doc/xml/manual/iterators.xml	(revision 182452)
+++ doc/xml/manual/iterators.xml	(working copy)
@@ -41,7 +41,7 @@  classes.
      that <emphasis>pointers</emphasis> are
       <emphasis>iterators</emphasis>, and that pointers can be used
      whenever an iterator would be.  All those functions in the
-     Algorithms sect1 of the Standard will work just as well on plain
+     Algorithms section of the Standard will work just as well on plain
      arrays and their pointers.
    </para>
    <para>
Index: doc/xml/manual/algorithms.xml
===================================================================
--- doc/xml/manual/algorithms.xml	(revision 182452)
+++ doc/xml/manual/algorithms.xml	(working copy)
@@ -22,7 +22,7 @@ 
 
 
 <para>
-  The neatest accomplishment of the algorithms sect1 is that all the
+  The neatest accomplishment of the algorithms section is that all the
   work is done via iterators, not containers directly.  This means two
   important things:
 </para>
@@ -53,14 +53,14 @@ 
   <emphasis>N</emphasis> as a size in the examples is to keep things
   easy to read but probably won't be valid code.  You can use wrappers
   such as those described in
-  the <link linkend="std.containers">containers sect1</link> to keep
+  the <link linkend="std.containers">containers section</link> to keep
   real code readable.
 </para>
 <para>
   The single thing that trips people up the most is the definition
   of <emphasis>range</emphasis> used with iterators; the famous
   "past-the-end" rule that everybody loves to hate.  The
-  <link linkend="std.iterators">iterators sect1</link> of this
+  <link linkend="std.iterators">iterators section</link> of this
     document has a complete explanation of this simple rule that seems
     to cause so much confusion.  Once you
     get <emphasis>range</emphasis> into your head (it's not that hard,
Index: doc/html/manual/iterators.html
===================================================================
--- doc/html/manual/iterators.html	(revision 182452)
+++ doc/html/manual/iterators.html	(working copy)
@@ -23,7 +23,7 @@  classes.
      that <span class="emphasis"><em>pointers</em></span> are
       <span class="emphasis"><em>iterators</em></span>, and that pointers can be used
      whenever an iterator would be.  All those functions in the
-     Algorithms sect1 of the Standard will work just as well on plain
+     Algorithms section of the Standard will work just as well on plain
      arrays and their pointers.
    </p><p>
      That doesn't mean that when you pass in a pointer, it gets
Index: doc/html/manual/algorithms.html
===================================================================
--- doc/html/manual/algorithms.html	(revision 182452)
+++ doc/html/manual/algorithms.html	(working copy)
@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ 
   Algorithms
   <a id="id612473" class="indexterm"/>
 </h2></div></div></div><div class="toc"><p><strong>Table of Contents</strong></p><dl><dt><span class="section"><a href="algorithms.html#std.algorithms.mutating">Mutating</a></span></dt><dd><dl><dt><span class="section"><a href="algorithms.html#algorithms.mutating.swap"><code class="function">swap</code></a></span></dt><dd><dl><dt><span class="section"><a href="algorithms.html#algorithms.swap.specializations">Specializations</a></span></dt></dl></dd></dl></dd></dl></div><p>
-  The neatest accomplishment of the algorithms sect1 is that all the
+  The neatest accomplishment of the algorithms section is that all the
   work is done via iterators, not containers directly.  This means two
   important things:
 </p><div class="orderedlist"><ol class="orderedlist"><li class="listitem"><p>
@@ -31,13 +31,13 @@ 
   <span class="emphasis"><em>N</em></span> as a size in the examples is to keep things
   easy to read but probably won't be valid code.  You can use wrappers
   such as those described in
-  the <a class="link" href="containers.html" title="Chapter 9.  Containers">containers sect1</a> to keep
+  the <a class="link" href="containers.html" title="Chapter 9.  Containers">containers section</a> to keep
   real code readable.
 </p><p>
   The single thing that trips people up the most is the definition
   of <span class="emphasis"><em>range</em></span> used with iterators; the famous
   "past-the-end" rule that everybody loves to hate.  The
-  <a class="link" href="iterators.html" title="Chapter 10.  Iterators">iterators sect1</a> of this
+  <a class="link" href="iterators.html" title="Chapter 10.  Iterators">iterators section</a> of this
     document has a complete explanation of this simple rule that seems
     to cause so much confusion.  Once you
     get <span class="emphasis"><em>range</em></span> into your head (it's not that hard,